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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to say is you have to learn to pay that and that's exactly what the reagan administration did when they found themselves with somebody they can do business with. it could and ronald reagan may have been the only guy in the administration that believed in the near option that by god u.n. after. and here i ha
in rebuilding the infrastructure of the country. let's try time prove the competitiveness of u.s. industry and we have got to shift to more export and investment-led growth and away from residential investment and consumer spending. i think that's the overview of what he was saying in the campaign. and i think you are right, laura, that the only thick that we were arguing about was high income people's tax rates and should they go back to what they were in the 90's. that would be totally inadequate as a complete plan. i think in 2013, i wish we could do it before, but i think it's going to be 2013, i think we're going to sit down and they probably will hammer out something like a grand bargain. that would be a pretty big accomplishment. that will involve substantial -- will have to involve substantial spending cuts. >> we're not even talking about. republicans aren't making the case as far as i can tell for real spending cuts. i mean the president doesn't have to give in because is he not having to argue against anyone on those issues. dr. goolsbee it's great to see you as always. thanks s
they have a man in their custody they believe is connected to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi on september 11th and killed four americans including ambassador chris stephens. according to an e judicial source the man is identified as being in his late 30s. he is known to egyptian intelligence officials for his connections in the past with extremist groups in egypt and libya and his connections with groups in afghanistan and iraq. after the country's revolution he managed to escape from a prison where he was being held. it was shortly afterwards he emerged on this scene for egyptian intelligence officials who say he began trading in arms between libya into egypt and then ultimately onto gaza. right now there's no indication what role he may have played precisely in the attack on the u.s. consulate. he is being held in egyptian custody. there were some conflicting reports as to when he was actually detained. some suggested he was arrested on friday morning. there were other reports suggesting he had been arrested several weeks ago. right now he remains in egyptian custody. he ha
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
the u.s. president should take a in terms of a more realistic, short-term approach to facing challenges are a long term visionary approach where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10-20 years. which of the following approaches to you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? you will see two options. should a u.s. president take a practical approach and difficult times addressing near-term challenges or a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for the future and not losing perspective of where we want to go to? go ahead and text to 22333. the response code you agree with et.you can tweak at @gt we will see if it matches the opinion poll. a fair size minority, about the 44% felt short-term obstacles was the important focus of the nation. it looks like once again we have come close to the national poll with 67% of the audience i in the room and online voting for a visionary approach looking at long-term goals for the country instead of a short-term perspective. i think this would be another good thing for elected officials to keep a in mind as the
do. >> depositions rising in syria as the u.s. confirms its stance on political transition there. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insirsing that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. sunni any allawi, christians, kurds, druce, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> is just who is president bashar assad and how big of a threat is he to the world? here to weigh in senior fellow defense studdies lt. colonel tony shaffer. set up for the audience who is bashar assad? >> bashar assad is the former president of the syria took over in 1971. and ruled frank whether i an iron fist assad took over in. there was hope that there would be reforms and much like other dictators who come in. it's double down and continue the same policies and trends as his former -- the person he replaced. we saw this in north korea and we are seeing it again. >> talk about the latest news. there are reports that assad has weapons
different laws than we do. if there say technology drain, it's also in terms of the u.s. laws we only prohibit certain type of technology that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk in steve's case the talent of the invite tive things that get sucked out along with that, that's nobody really talks about that so i'd like to hear from you. >> it's true. what you are saying is true. it goes back to what i was saying the other countries are being a magnet for talent, there is no question about this so we have to recognize that is happening and make sure we're competitive. my own view is if people want to come here and get an education and go back to their country, fine, that is a way to build stronger committees in other parts of the world. that is part of our stated policy. having people come here if they want to go back and start companies there, that's fine. but we should at least give them the option of staying here. if they want to go back fine, but don't force them. encourage them to stay because we need smart people here working on these new technologies
. there are patterns. if you look at the number one ranked restaurant in the u.s. at the time i wrote this, he has a process of creating new dishes, and it's a similar process used by investors and similar to some of the top athletes. distilling that into one blueprint that people can apply to whatever they want to learn whether it's guitar, spanish or whatnot, what is the goal. for this, food is the trojan horse. >> gavin: 700 pages. >> the big one. >> gavin: but substantively it's still about the art of cooking. it's still about food, and it's been interesting and well reviewed. you have critiques saying, wow this works. >> it's amazing. i thought i was really going to get drawn and quartered by the food guys. i really did. it's oddly enough it's the food guys, the food people--people i don't know at all who have in many cases reviewed it the best. and the book people who have come after me. >> gavin: but i guess this is because of the notion of meta learning. what is the idea in the principles behind meta learning. that's fund mentally what your " "4-hour" series had been about. >> i would hav
's move on to jobs, charles blow. u.s. created 146,000 jobs in november, higher than predicted. clearly jack walsh's theory, obama was cooking the books, probably cannot be true now. unemployment 7.7%, lowest in four years. most interesting story of the week, though, because i campaigned about this pretty relentlessly, apple have announced they are going to bring jobs back to america. let's play how i have been trying to force this issue for quite some time. >> companies like apple, you have ten times as many employees in china now than america. what do you think of the concept of moral capitalism? i feel strongly about companies like apple, for example, who outsource all the jobs to china, a lot of it comes back here. >> i have a problem with this. apple makes $100 billion but apple employs more people in china than it does in america. that to me is wrong. >> now, there is a globalization aspect to this and what i don't want to do is tell a company like apple look, you can't be a global business anymore because you've got to bring it all back to america. that's not what this is about.
and not half real plan spree did not have -- not have rail plans and. my concern is whether the u.s. has priorities of where to begin and where we would end. what we have seen in the past couple of years is no funding from the federal government. we really comment in some kind of dream of going, some of the state's will continue to move forward because even in the best circumstances as we approach the cliff, in not going over there will be very significant reductions in every kind of program made. that is the case. i need to hear the case for why we would prioritize at least one of the places you have funded that looks like it is ready to go and go with it. if you do not do that, you must have some view that some miracle is going to happen in the economy so at least the public sector will continue funding. i cannot see that. if it is not the case that we can expect public funding for all parts of the country and in next five years. let's take the near term. what do you think is the best way to proceed with what scarce funds you may recede? -- receive? we know this. if you start, we try t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)